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Duck-Fil-A, or How ‘Duck Dynasty’ Star Phil Robertson Prefers Vagina to a Man’s Anus

“Duck-fil-A” is how a columnist from The American Conservative described what he expects will happen to the A&E reality hit Duck Dynasty after Phil Robertson, the patriarch of the highly successful Louisiana clan, gave an interview to GQ in which he held “to normative Christian views about sexuality, and express that somewhat crudely.”

“Duck-fil-A,” of course, refers to the backlash against anti-gay Chick-fil-A President Dan Cathy’s enthusiastic, “guilty-as-charged” support of "Biblical" families. Well, Chick-fil-A is still doing a thriving, calorie-and-artery-exploding fast food business, and Duck Dynasty’s brand just raked in $400 million in revenues, according to Forbes, turning survivalist camouflage fatigues into must-have stylish apparel—so we’ll see how far a "backlash" travels.

But squirrel-eating Robertson and fried-chikin-eating Cathy do share a taste for anti-gay pronouncements. From the GQ piece:

Out here in these woods, without any cameras around, Phil is free to say what he wants. Maybe a little too free. He’s got lots of thoughts on modern immorality, and there’s no stopping them from rushing out. Like this one:

“It seems like, to me, a vagina—as a man—would be more desirable than a man’s anus. That’s just me. I’m just thinking: There’s more there! She’s got more to offer. I mean, come on, dudes! You know what I’m saying? But hey, sin: It’s not logical, my man. It’s just not logical.” ...

What does repentance entail? Well, in Robertson’s worldview, America was a country founded upon Christian values (Thou shalt not kill, etc.), and he believes that the gradual removal of Christian symbolism from public spaces has diluted those founding principles. (He and Si take turns going on about why the Ten Commandments ought to be displayed outside courthouses.) He sees the popularity of Duck Dynasty as a small corrective to all that we have lost.

“Everything is blurred on what’s right and what’s wrong,” he says. “Sin becomes fine.”

What, in your mind, is sinful?

“Start with homosexual behavior and just morph out from there. Bestiality, sleeping around with this woman and that woman and that woman and those men,” he says. Then he paraphrases Corinthians: “Don’t be deceived. Neither the adulterers, the idolaters, the male prostitutes, the homosexual offenders, the greedy, the drunkards, the slanderers, the swindlers—they won’t inherit the kingdom of God. Don’t deceive yourself. It’s not right.”

GLAAD spokesperson Wilson Cruz immediately responded:

Phil and his family claim to be Christian, but Phil's lies about an entire community fly in the face of what true Christians believe. He clearly knows nothing about gay people or the majority of Louisianans—and Americans—who support legal recognition for loving and committed gay and lesbian couples. Phil's decision to push vile and extreme stereotypes is a stain on A&E and his sponsors who now need to reexamine their ties to someone with such public disdain for LGBT people and families.

Just as they did with Chick-fil-A, the rabid right is sucking up to Duck Dynasty. Media Matters reports that Fox News Radio reporter Todd Starnes has been tweeting out a defense of the self-described Bible-thumpers, calling critics "intolerant, anti-Christian," and "Anti-Straight ... haters."

My, my. What’s going into and coming out of his mouth?

Huffington Post/Gay Voices just updated their story with a statement from A&E:

A representative from A&E sent the following statement to The Huffington Post from Phil Roberston in response to the controversy:

“I myself am a product of the 60s; I centered my life around sex, drugs and rock and roll until I hit rock bottom and accepted Jesus as my Savior. My mission today is to go forth and tell people about why I follow Christ and also what the bible teaches, and part of that teaching is that women and men are meant to be together. However, I would never treat anyone with disrespect just because they are different from me. We are all created by the Almighty and like Him, I love all of humanity. We would all be better off if we loved God and loved each other.”

A quote in the Los Angeles Times may raise even more eyebrows, as Robertson suggests that African-Americans in Louisiana during the Jim Crow era were, well, basically content with their lot: 

"Where we lived was all farmers. The blacks worked for the farmers. I hoed cotton with them. I'm with the blacks, because we're white trash," he said. "They're singing and happy. I never heard one of them, one black person, say, ‘I tell you what: These doggone white people’—not a word! ... Pre-entitlement, pre-welfare, you say: Were they happy? They were godly; they were happy; no one was singing the blues.” 

Meanwhile, the Human Rights Campaign just added its voice to the chorus of complaints:

Human Rights Campaign president Chad Griffin shared the following statement in response:

“Phil Robertson’s remarks are not consistent with the values of our faith communities or the scientific findings of leading medical organizations. We know that being gay is not a choice someone makes, and that to suggest otherwise can be incredibly harmful. We also know that Americans of faith follow the Golden Rule—treating others with the respect and dignity you’d wish to be treated with. As a role model on a show that attracts millions of viewers, Phil Robertson has a responsibility to set a positive example for young Americans—not shame and ridicule them because of who they are.

The actions of Phil Robertson unquestionably reflect on A&E. The network should take immediate action to condemn Phil Robertson’s remarks and make clear they don’t support his views.

2013 has been a year of tremendous progress for equality across the entire country. We’ve seen straight Americans stand up for their LGBT friends and loved ones like never before—showing their support for marriage equality in communities across the country, lobbying their lawmakers for equal workplace protections for their LGBT neighbors, and standing shoulder-to-shoulder with us against hate crimes targeting people just for who they loved. I hope young people hurt by Phil Robertson’s comments remember these victories rather than his callous words. This is a reminder that our work of changing hearts and minds is far from complete.”

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