INFORMATION ON HIV/AIDS TREATMENT, PREVENTION AND RESEARCH FROM DHHS

On August 28, 2014, FDA approved updates to the label for Stribild (elvitegravir 150 mg/cobicistat 150 mg/emtricitabine 200 mg/tenofovir 300 mg) fixed-dose combination tablets. The label was updated with efficacy, resistance, and safety data from two clinical trials; renal information; and drug interaction information.

The updated labeling for Stribild is available at the FDA website

More information is available: 
National HIV/AIDS and Aging Awareness Day is a day set aside each year to recognize the impact of HIV/AIDS among older adults. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), adults aged 55 and older accounted for 19% of the estimated 1.1 million people living with HIV infection in the United States in 2010. Older Americans are more likely than younger Americans to be diagnosed with HIV infection late in the course of their disease, which may mean a later start to treatment, possibly causing more damage to their immune system. This can lead to poorer prognoses and shorter HIV-to-AIDS intervals.

Visit our National HIV/AIDS and Aging Awareness Day webpage [en español] to learn more about this observance and to find information on HIV/AIDS and aging.
"An NIH-led team of scientists has discovered a new vulnerability in the armor of HIV that a vaccine, other preventive regimen or treatment could exploit. The site straddles two proteins, gp41 and gp120, that jut out of the virus and augments other known places where broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) bind to HIV. This newly identified site on the viral spike is where a new antibody found by the scientists in an HIV-infected person binds to the virus. Called 35O22, the antibody prevents 62 percent of known HIV strains from infecting cells in the laboratory and is extremely potent, meaning even a relatively small amount of it can neutralize the virus."

More information is available:
"On August 22, 2014, FDA approved a new fixed-dose combination product: TRIUMEQ, a combination of dolutegravir (integrase strand transfer inhibitor), abacavir sulfate and lamivudine (both nucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitors) for the treatment of HIV-1 infection. 
  • "TRIUMEQ alone is not recommended for use in patients with current or past history of resistance to any components of TRIUMEQ.
  • "TRIUMEQ alone is not recommended in patients with resistance-associated integrase substitutions or clinically suspected integrase strand transfer inhibitor resistance because the dose of dolutegravir in TRIUMEQ is insufficient in these subpopulations. See full prescribing information for dolutegravir. 
"The recommended dosage regimen of TRIUMEQ in adults is one tablet once daily orally with or without food."

The complete label for Triumeq is available at the FDA website.

For more information, view the FDA press release.
"On August 20, 2014, the Intelence (etravirine) label was updated to include information regarding coadministration of etravirine with the following drugs:
  • "dolutegravir, dolutegravir/darunavir/ritonavir, dolutegravir/lopinavir/ritonavir
  • "atazanavir/ritonavir
  • "boceprevir"
The updated labeling for etravirine is available at the FDA website.

More information is available:
The free AIDSinfo HIV/AIDS Glossary apps for Apple and Android devices provide on-the-go access to definitions for more than 700 HIV/AIDS-related terms in English and Spanish. The apps also include an audio feature so users can hear the correct pronunciation of each term.
 
The Glossary app for iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch is now optimized for iOS7. The updated app features an iOS7-compatible look and feel and a new icon. The upgrade also included minor bug fixes.
 
Whether you are new to the Glossary app or a long-time user, download the latest, iOS7-optimized version of the app for your Apple device today. Feedback on the updated app is welcome. Please e-mail your comments to ContactUs@aidsinfo.nih.gov.
 
"Scientists are pursuing injections or intravenous infusions of broadly neutralizing HIV antibodies (bNAbs) as a strategy for preventing HIV infection. This technique, called passive immunization, has been shown to protect monkeys from a monkey form of HIV called simian human immunodeficiency virus, or SHIV. To make passive immunization a widely feasible HIV prevention option for people, scientists want to modify bNAbs such that a modest amount of them is needed only once every few months.

"To that end, an NIH-led team of scientists has mutated the powerful anti-HIV bNAb called VRC01 so that, once infused into monkeys, it lasts three times longer in blood than unmutated VRC01, collects in rectal mucosal tissue, and persists there more than twice as long as unmutated VRC01. Concentrating anti-HIV bNAbs at mucosal surfaces of the rectum and vagina, the subject of additional study, is critical for blocking sexual transmission of HIV.

"In addition, the scientists found, a low-dose infusion of mutated VRC01 protected monkeys against SHIV infection more effectively than a low-dose infusion of unmutated VRC01."

More information is available:
AIDSinfo is pleased to announce the release of our HIV/AIDS Awareness Day widget! Add the widget to your website or blog to display the logos for the national HIV/AIDS awareness days. The logos will link to the AIDSinfo HIV/AIDS awareness day pages. The widget also provides links to the infoSIDA HIV/AIDS awareness day pages

Along with our HIV/AIDS awareness day widget, we also have a widget for our news feed. Add this widget to your website to display the latest HIV/AIDS treatment, prevention, and research news.

Instructions for adding the widgets to your website can be found on the AIDSinfo widget page

Questions about our widgets? Please send an e-mail to ContactUs@aidsinfo.nih.gov.

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