INFORMATION ON HIV/AIDS TREATMENT, PREVENTION AND RESEARCH FROM DHHS

"On August 22, 2014, FDA approved a new fixed-dose combination product: TRIUMEQ, a combination of dolutegravir (integrase strand transfer inhibitor), abacavir sulfate and lamivudine (both nucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitors) for the treatment of HIV-1 infection. 
  • "TRIUMEQ alone is not recommended for use in patients with current or past history of resistance to any components of TRIUMEQ.
  • "TRIUMEQ alone is not recommended in patients with resistance-associated integrase substitutions or clinically suspected integrase strand transfer inhibitor resistance because the dose of dolutegravir in TRIUMEQ is insufficient in these subpopulations. See full prescribing information for dolutegravir. 
"The recommended dosage regimen of TRIUMEQ in adults is one tablet once daily orally with or without food."

The complete label for Triumeq is available at the FDA website.

For more information, view the FDA press release.
"On August 20, 2014, the Intelence (etravirine) label was updated to include information regarding coadministration of etravirine with the following drugs:
  • "dolutegravir, dolutegravir/darunavir/ritonavir, dolutegravir/lopinavir/ritonavir
  • "atazanavir/ritonavir
  • "boceprevir"
The updated labeling for etravirine is available at the FDA website.

More information is available:
The free AIDSinfo HIV/AIDS Glossary apps for Apple and Android devices provide on-the-go access to definitions for more than 700 HIV/AIDS-related terms in English and Spanish. The apps also include an audio feature so users can hear the correct pronunciation of each term.
 
The Glossary app for iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch is now optimized for iOS7. The updated app features an iOS7-compatible look and feel and a new icon. The upgrade also included minor bug fixes.
 
Whether you are new to the Glossary app or a long-time user, download the latest, iOS7-optimized version of the app for your Apple device today. Feedback on the updated app is welcome. Please e-mail your comments to ContactUs@aidsinfo.nih.gov.
 
"Scientists are pursuing injections or intravenous infusions of broadly neutralizing HIV antibodies (bNAbs) as a strategy for preventing HIV infection. This technique, called passive immunization, has been shown to protect monkeys from a monkey form of HIV called simian human immunodeficiency virus, or SHIV. To make passive immunization a widely feasible HIV prevention option for people, scientists want to modify bNAbs such that a modest amount of them is needed only once every few months.

"To that end, an NIH-led team of scientists has mutated the powerful anti-HIV bNAb called VRC01 so that, once infused into monkeys, it lasts three times longer in blood than unmutated VRC01, collects in rectal mucosal tissue, and persists there more than twice as long as unmutated VRC01. Concentrating anti-HIV bNAbs at mucosal surfaces of the rectum and vagina, the subject of additional study, is critical for blocking sexual transmission of HIV.

"In addition, the scientists found, a low-dose infusion of mutated VRC01 protected monkeys against SHIV infection more effectively than a low-dose infusion of unmutated VRC01."

More information is available:
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"The child known as the 'Mississippi baby'—an infant seemingly cured of HIV that was reported as a case study of a prolonged remission of HIV infection in The New England Journal of Medicine last fall—now has detectable levels of HIV after more than two years of not taking antiretroviral therapy without evidence of virus, according to the pediatric HIV specialist and researchers involved in the case.

"'Certainly, this is a disappointing turn of events for this young child, the medical staff involved in the child’s care, and the HIV/AIDS research community,' said NIAID Director Anthony S. Fauci, M.D. 'Scientifically, this development reminds us that we still have much more to learn about the intricacies of HIV infection and where the virus hides in the body. The NIH remains committed to moving forward with research on a cure for HIV infection.'"

More information is available:
"Though combination antiretroviral therapy reduces the concentration of HIV-1 RNA in both plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) below the detection limit of clinical assays, low levels of HIV-1 RNA are frequently detectable in plasma using more sensitive assays. We examined the frequency and magnitude of persistent low-level HIV-1 RNA in CSF and its relation to the central nervous system (CNS) immune activation. …

"CSF and plasma HIV-1 RNA were measured using the single-copy assay with a detection limit of 0.3 copies/ml in 70 CSF and 68 plasma samples from 45 treated HIV-1-infected patients with less than 40 copies/ml of HIV-1 RNA in both fluids by standard clinical assays. …

"CSF HIV-1 RNA was detected in 12 of the 70 CSF samples (17%) taken after up to 10 years of suppressive therapy, compared to 39 of the 68 plasma samples (57%) with a median concentration of less than 0.3 copies/ml in CSF compared to 0.3 copies/ml in plasma (P<0.0001). …

"Low-level CSF HIV-1 RNA and its association with elevated CSF neopterin highlight the potential for the CNS to serve as a viral reservoir and for persistent infection to cause subclinical CNS injury."

More information is available:

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